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Posts for tag: crowns

By EDWIN YEE
October 02, 2018
Category: Dental Procedures

Damaged TeethWhat your dentist in Pensacola, Florida wants you to know

Are you wondering if you need a dental crown? There are some definite indications that a dental crown is an excellent option. Dr. Edwin Yee in Pensacola, Florida wants to share the facts about when a dental crown is needed.

If your tooth is badly damaged, that can be an obvious reason why you need a dental crown. Your tooth may benefit from a dental crown if the tooth is:

  • Broken or fractured from an injury to your jaws or face
  • Severely decayed on many surfaces of the tooth
  • Badly eroded and chipped from aging or bad habits
  • Compromised from a large metal filling

You should also have a dental crown placed on a tooth which has had a root canal. That’s because root canal treatment can make a tooth brittle and more prone to fracture. A dental crown protects the weakened tooth.

A dental crown covers the entire visible surface of a tooth above the gumline. It covers your tooth like a suit-of-armor, spreading the pressure of chewing across the entire surface of the tooth. Even distribution of pressure and stress helps protect your tooth.

There are many reasons why a dental crown is needed, but you may also choose a crown to make your smile more beautiful. That’s because today’s crowns are made of natural-looking materials like porcelain, which reflects light. Dental crowns can replace large, ugly metal fillings, giving you a whiter, more dazzling smile, free of unsightly metal.

If you have a tooth that is badly damaged or decayed, a crown is an excellent option to rebuild your smile. A dental crown can restore full chewing function and beauty, helping your smile stand out. For more information about dental crowns and other restorative, cosmetic, and preventive services, call Dr. Edwin Yee in Pensacola, Florida today!

By Edwin Yee
June 23, 2018
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: crowns  
RoyalTreatmentforaDamagedTooth

If your tooth sustains damage that compromises its structure — typically through decay or trauma — you have several options depending on the extent of the damage: One of them is a crown. This method saves the tooth and its root and completely conceals the visible portion of the tooth, or crown, under a natural-looking cap made to mimic as closely as possible the size, shape and color of the original tooth.

Crowns also hide imperfections in the original tooth like discoloration, chipping, fractures, excessive wear (from bruxism, or tooth grinding, for example), or abnormalities in the way the tooth formed. And they’re used following root canal treatments, which treat infected pulp at the center (canal) of a tooth root by removing the pulp and replacing it with an inert, rubber-like material.

Saving the natural tooth has long been the goal of dentistry because normal micromovements of the tooth root, which is suspended in its jawbone socket by elastic ligaments, stimulate the surrounding bone to rejuvenate. Without that stimulation, the bone continues to lose old cells, but no longer replaces them. Crowns are also designed to restore tooth function.

The function and location of the damaged tooth can determine what material the crown will be made of. If the damaged tooth is clearly visible when you smile, porcelain, the most realistic-looking material, is almost always used. If the tooth receives significant bite force, a stronger material is considered — either, a gold/porcelain combination, or a high-strength ceramic. If you are restoring a second molar, an all-gold crown may be considered.

With the advent of dental implants, saving a damaged tooth is no longer the only option for preserving the health of the bone surrounding the tooth root. The implant — a tiny biocompatible, titanium screw-like artificial root — is placed in the jawbone and is then capped with a natural-looking crown of course!

If you would like more information about dental crowns, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Crowns & Bridgework.”

By Edwin Yee
July 16, 2017
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: celebrity smiles   crowns  
DentalCrownsfortheKingofMagic

You might think David Copperfield leads a charmed life:  He can escape from ropes, chains, and prison cells, make a Learjet or a railroad car disappear, and even appear to fly above the stage. But the illustrious illusionist will be the first to admit that making all that magic takes a lot of hard work. And he recently told Dear Doctor magazine that his brilliant smile has benefitted from plenty of behind-the-scenes dental work as well.

“When I was a kid, I had every kind of [treatment]. I had braces, I had headgear, I had rubber bands, and a retainer afterward,” Copperfield said. And then, just when his orthodontic treatment was finally complete, disaster struck. “I was at a mall, running down this concrete alleyway, and there was a little ledge… and I went BOOM!”

Copperfield’s two front teeth were badly injured by the impact. “My front teeth became nice little points,” he said. Yet, although they had lost a great deal of their structure, his dentist was able to restore those damaged teeth in a very natural-looking way. What kind of “magic” did the dentist use?

In Copperfield’s case, the teeth were repaired using crown restorations. Crowns (also called caps) are suitable when a tooth has lost part of its visible structure, but still has healthy roots beneath the gum line. To perform a crown restoration, the first step is to make a precise model of your teeth, often called an impression. This allows a replacement for the visible part of the tooth to be fabricated, and ensures it will fit precisely into your smile. In its exact shape and shade, a well-made crown matches your natural teeth so well that it’s virtually impossible to tell them apart. Subsequently, the crown restoration is permanently attached to the damaged tooth.

There’s a blend of technology and art in making high quality crowns — just as there is in some stage-crafted illusions. But the difference is that the replacement tooth is not just an illusion: It looks, functions and “feels” like your natural teeth… and with proper care it can last for many years to come.  Besides crowns, there are several other types of tooth restorations that are suitable in different situations. We can recommend the right kind of “magic” for you.

If you would like more information about crowns, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine articles “Crowns & Bridgework” and “Porcelain Crowns & Veneers.”